The US Health Department is using iBeacons to make its employees walk more

Last year Apple introduced iBeacons, low-energy Bluetooth transmitters that wirelessly send alerts to your iPhone based on your proximity, touting them as a way for retailers to reach shoppers more directly with discounts and deals. As it turns out, they may be good for other things too, like helping you stay more physically fit. The US Department of Health and Human Services has installed several iBeacons and other wireless transmitters throughout its headquarters building in Washington, D.C. that send employees alerts encouraging them to “take the long way back to their desks,” and hydrate more, as Bloomberg reports.

The executive in charge of the project calls them “an angel on your shoulder helping you make the right choices.”…

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Christopher Nolan doesn’t have an email address

Director Christopher Nolan has a new movie coming out soon: Interstellar, a big budget, original sci-fi film (original, as in, not adapted from any pre-existing novel or comic book property), which hits theaters and IMAXes across the US on Friday, November 7th. I’m excited to see it, as I’m sure many of you are. But until then, you can whet your appetite with a lengthy New York Times Magazine profile of Mr. Nolan, which explores how he came to make a bunch of commercially successfully and critically acclaimed movies over the past two decades: MementoThe PrestigeThe Dark Knight trilogy among them.

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FCC might give Netflix what it wants and still allow Comcast to sell fast lanes

report published this afternoon by The New York Times details one of the possible plans the FCC may debut in their attempt to establish new rules around net neutrality and the open internet. It takes a “hybrid” approach, dividing the new regulations between commercial or wholesale internet traffic and retail or residential internet traffic. In a nutshell, this would mean content companies like Netflix will get the price controls they want when it comes to dealing with companies like Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T. But those companies will also be allowed to give certain data a fast lane over their networks if it was “justified,” cementing the gutting of net neutrality that occurred when Verizon defeated the FCC in court.

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